Disliking hip-hop doesn’t make you a racist any more than liking hip-hop makes you not a racist, and I’m sure there are plenty of Stormfront enthusiasts with Rick Ross in their iTunes. If you don’t like Jay-Z because you just don’t like the way he sounds, or you’re sick of his cloying ubiquity, or you wish he’d talk about something other than where he’s from for five seconds—hey, I’m not mad, I don’t like Bruce Springsteen for the same reasons. But if you don’t like rap music—a genre that contains multitudes—because of a self-satisfied moralism, or because you’re scared of it, or because you wish those people would stop talking about their problems and get out of your television and radio and kids’ bedrooms: well.

And I’m not just talking about the American right, I’m talking about all the well-meaning white folks who’ve told me how they want to like Lil Wayne but lo, the misogyny, the violence, the drugs. But, but, I’ll say: Bob Dylan aced misogyny; the Rolling Stones sang about violence; the Velvet Underground knew their way around some drugs. Yeeeah, but it’s different, they’ll say, elongating that “yeah” with conspiratorial inflection: you know what I mean. Yeah, I know exactly what you mean.

Rap music doesn’t get unarmed kids shot to death, “it’s different” does. “It’s different” infuses “these assholes always get away” and gives solace to people who hear that sound bite and nod their empty heads in agreement. “It’s different” is the same logic that suggests a teenager’s skin color combined with the music he listened to means he had it coming, and it’s the same logic that lets a bunch of people feign outrage over a teenager’s use of the n-word to describe himself when they’re really just outraged that he beat them to the punch.

“It’s different” makes me shake with anger because it turns music into a dog-whistle to justify the murder of a kid who doesn’t seem all that “different” from me was when I was his age, not that different at all. I liked Skittles and hoodies and weed, too. And yeah, I’m white and never worried about getting shot for any of it, which is only the most loathsome excuse for not identifying with someone that I can possibly think of.

Jack Hamilton, “America Is Dying Slowly: Talking About Hip-Hop After Trayvon Martin" (Good)

(via monstersqueen)

fuckyeahsexeducation:

katelucia:

Jada Pinkett-Smith is aware of the critics that frown up their noses at the way she raises her daughter, Willow. Willow cuts, dyes and styles her hair as she pleases, a fact that bothers many who feel girls shouldn’t have that much control over their appearance at such a young age.
Jada decided to address the criticism in a Facebook post:

“A letter to a friend…This subject is old but I have never answered it in its entirety. And even with this post it will remain incomplete. The question why I would LET Willow cut her hair. First the LET must be challenged. This is a world where women, girls are constantly reminded that they don’t belong to themselves; that their bodies are not their own, nor their power or self determination. I made a promise to endow my little girl with the power to always know that her body, spirit and her mind are HER domain. Willow cut her hair because her beauty, her value, her worth is not measured by the length of her hair. It’s also a statement that claims that even little girls have the RIGHT to own themselves and should not be a slave to even their mother’s deepest insecurities, hopes and desires. Even little girls should not be a slave to the preconceived ideas of what a culture believes a little girl should be.”



I’m pretty sure I’ve reblogged this before but seriously this is something we should be teaching all our children. Their bodies are theirs, not ours as parents. As soon as you tell someone their body doesn’t belong to theirs you take away so much from them.

fuckyeahsexeducation:

katelucia:

Jada Pinkett-Smith is aware of the critics that frown up their noses at the way she raises her daughter, Willow. Willow cuts, dyes and styles her hair as she pleases, a fact that bothers many who feel girls shouldn’t have that much control over their appearance at such a young age.

Jada decided to address the criticism in a Facebook post:

“A letter to a friend…This subject is old but I have never answered it in its entirety. And even with this post it will remain incomplete. The question why I would LET Willow cut her hair. First the LET must be challenged. This is a world where women, girls are constantly reminded that they don’t belong to themselves; that their bodies are not their own, nor their power or self determination. I made a promise to endow my little girl with the power to always know that her body, spirit and her mind are HER domain. Willow cut her hair because her beauty, her value, her worth is not measured by the length of her hair. It’s also a statement that claims that even little girls have the RIGHT to own themselves and should not be a slave to even their mother’s deepest insecurities, hopes and desires. Even little girls should not be a slave to the preconceived ideas of what a culture believes a little girl should be.”

image

I’m pretty sure I’ve reblogged this before but seriously this is something we should be teaching all our children. Their bodies are theirs, not ours as parents. As soon as you tell someone their body doesn’t belong to theirs you take away so much from them.

(via whathecky)


This is why you weren’t in the avengers

This is why you weren’t in the avengers

(via pancakistan)

short-and-artsy:

in which jade smooches everyone in the name of SCIENCE

(via aapollojustiice)

adrien-gromelle:

i-am-babulous:

ethevagabond:

ktshy:

adrien-gromelle:

I always had a thing for hand animated camera move and turn around…
I can’t tell exactly why…
probably cause it gives me the feeling I can manage everything and show exactly what I have in my head.
that can seems stupid but it makes me feel like, sculpting the animation more than drawing it.

DANG! Anyone know what these are from?

Credits Please cause these are awesome. 

Hey ethevagabond.  I tried, but unfortunately, I could only identify the first, MYOSIS.

Hi everyone… sorry to answer so late
the first is a shot I did in Myosis”(link)
the second was an ”exercice”(link) in 1st year at gobelins
the third is a shot I animated for the short ”Oni”(link) realized with friend as an FX exercise.
the last (it was the more painful to do) is a shot extracted from our opening for the Annecy animation Festival ”Hurley’s Irish”(link)

enjoy ;)

(via whathecky)

To all the Tumblr users who tend to use tags very liberally:

thejadedkiwano:

Let’s play a game.

Type the following words into your tags box, then post the first automatic tag that comes up.

you, also, what, when, why, how, look, because, never

(via pancakistan)

klkpersonals:

mr-morden-speaks:

Women aren’t allowed in fight club.Newbies.


excuse you
#did you even watch this show wtf

klkpersonals:

mr-morden-speaks:

Women aren’t allowed in fight club.
Newbies.

excuse you

#did you even watch this show wtf

bramblepatch:

azzandra:

eternal-floette:

How long until the 15 year olds take over this post with their garbage

Nobody is arguing these people don’t exist. Internalized racism/misogyny/transphobia etc etc etc definitely exists. People who are not educated on issues, even those concerning themselves, definitely exist. People in outright denial certainly exist.

The OP is perhaps unaware that the people who do say that wearing a bindi is cutural appropriation or that you shouldn’t use homophobic slurs were once like the people in this very comic.

A lot of times, when I read posts or articles about why one of these things is wrong, the author will say something along the lines of “I used to be that black person saying that white people can have dreads” or “I used to be that trans person who defended cis people”, and invariably, they always conclude that it was a mistake, because no matter how accepting or chill or appeasing they were, they were still treated like shit AND used as an instrument to undercut their legitimate complaints.

So, you know. These people DO exist, OP is right. But OP conveniently ignores what many of these people eventually conclude. Because OP is doing that exact thing: using these people as an instrument to treat other people in those same groups as shit and undercut their legitimate complaints.

Also a lot of the time these are discussions that are actually taking place within the communities? And that need to be discussed and negotiated so that as many people within the community as possible will feel welcome and safe. I can’t speak to the racially based issues highlighted here (I Am White Disclaimer) but the gender and sexuality ones? Yeah, you better believe that we’re constantly talking about that shit. Reclamation of slurs. Politicized identities vs. living stealth and the pros and cons of each and how they relate to activism. The constant minefield of people with dramatically different lived experiences feeling drawn to the same vaguely defined terms because nonbinary folks don’t really have tried and true ways of talking about our genders the way that binary people do.

The thing is that if you’re not part of those groups, taking part in those intragroup discussions, you may not be aware that those discussions are taking place. And that’s partly because we don’t want you to be aware. Because you are going to latch onto the viewpoints that make you feel comfortable rather than understand the dynamics of us trying to make as many of us feel safe as possible, and when “make as many people safe as possible” is the goal, then yes, “I feel unsafe” does take priority over “I don’t feel that this has any effect on my safety one way or the other.” There’s a big difference between someone within the group voicing a dissenting opinion - which then can be examined and if appropriate, can be synthesized with or supplant existing wisdom - and someone outside the group playing devil’s advocate.

Also those last two examples there are pretty awful strawmen. It’s a rare woman or trans person who would seriously argue the contrary of those positions, and honestly? A lot of the ones who would are people who have been so profoundly hurt that they need the shelter a community provides, and if they’re going to heal they need to get there with the help of people who can understand the nuances of their “I hate all [insert privileged group here]” rhetoric. And effective allies recognize that sometimes they need to step back and let the people they’re trying help take care of their own. 

I see so much more hell-raising against “social justice warriors” than people who claim to be working in the name of social justice doing terrible things.  Unless, of course, they’re not actually part of the group they’re supposedly standing up for.

(via monstersqueen)

dirae3:

Teaching Consent to Small Children

afrafemme:

A friend and I were out with our kids when another family’s two-year-old came up. She began hugging my friend’s 18-month-old, following her around and smiling at her. My friend’s little girl looked like she wasn’t so sure she liked this, and at that moment the other little girl’s mom came up and got down on her little girl’s level to talk to her.

“Honey, can you listen to me for a moment? I’m glad you’ve found a new friend, but you need to make sure to look at her face to see if she likes it when you hug her. And if she doesn’t like it, you need to give her space. Okay?”

Two years old, and already her mother was teaching her about consent.

My daughter Sally likes to color on herself with markers. I tell her it’s her body, so it’s her choice. Sometimes she writes her name, sometimes she draws flowers or patterns. The other day I heard her talking to her brother, a marker in her hand.

“Bobby, do you mind if I color on your leg?”

Bobby smiled and moved himself closer to his sister. She began drawing a pattern on his leg with a marker while he watched, fascinated. Later, she began coloring on the sole of his foot. After each stoke, he pulled his foot back, laughing. I looked over to see what was causing the commotion, and Sally turned to me.

“He doesn’t mind if I do this,” she explained, “he is only moving his foot because it tickles. He thinks its funny.” And she was right. Already Bobby had extended his foot to her again, smiling as he did so.

What I find really fascinating about these two anecdotes is that they both deal with the consent of children not yet old enough to communicate verbally. In both stories, the older child must read the consent of the younger child through nonverbal cues. And even then, consent is not this ambiguous thing that is difficult to understand.

Teaching consent is ongoing, but it starts when children are very young. It involves both teaching children to pay attention to and respect others’ consent (or lack thereof) and teaching children that they should expect their own bodies and their own space to be respected—even by their parents and other relatives.

And if children of two or four can be expected to read the nonverbal cues and expressions of children not yet old enough to talk in order to assess whether there is consent, what excuse do full grown adults have?

(via monstersqueen)

In a classic experiment, the psychologist J. Philippe Rushton gave 140 elementary- and middle-school-age children tokens for winning a game, which they could keep entirely or donate some to a child in poverty. They first watched a teacher figure play the game either selfishly or generously, and then preach to them the value of taking, giving or neither. The adult’s influence was significant: Actions spoke louder than words. When the adult behaved selfishly, children followed suit. The words didn’t make much difference — children gave fewer tokens after observing the adult’s selfish actions, regardless of whether the adult verbally advocated selfishness or generosity. When the adult acted generously, students gave the same amount whether generosity was preached or not — they donated 85 percent more than the norm in both cases. When the adult preached selfishness, even after the adult acted generously, the students still gave 49 percent more than the norm. Children learn generosity not by listening to what their role models say, but by observing what they do.
"Raising a Moral Child" (via dirae3)

(via monstersqueen)

50s-dad:

fivehundredrevolutions:

A handy guide to some of the terrible things the Mail has printed since 1924.
This barely scratches the surface, though, I find it hard to believe they didn’t do anything terrible between 1956 and 1984.

and yet people still use it as a source
leftists from outside the UK still use it as a source
you all need to stop using the Daily Mail as a source FOREVER. Do not reblog, do not link, do not go to their site because they profit off ad traffic, and tell anybody you see doing any of these to immediately and permanently stop. We can’t run them into the ground but we can at least put a little dent in their profits and we can at least stop legitimising their bile by giving them anything other than negative attention.

50s-dad:

fivehundredrevolutions:

A handy guide to some of the terrible things the Mail has printed since 1924.

This barely scratches the surface, though, I find it hard to believe they didn’t do anything terrible between 1956 and 1984.

and yet people still use it as a source

leftists from outside the UK still use it as a source

you all need to stop using the Daily Mail as a source FOREVER. Do not reblog, do not link, do not go to their site because they profit off ad traffic, and tell anybody you see doing any of these to immediately and permanently stop. We can’t run them into the ground but we can at least put a little dent in their profits and we can at least stop legitimising their bile by giving them anything other than negative attention.

(via whathecky)

This is my personal blog. Regularly contains art, science, feminist and fandom things.

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